EFL/ESL Oasis KSA

Language Skills for Teachers and Learners of English


Before you start reading about the main skills below, try these starters! Then go down to know more about how to teach/learn the four language skills plus grammar and vocabulary.

 

 

  My thread in moeforum: How to improve your English skills

 

 How To Learn English

 

Teaching ...

  Grammar
  Reading
  Writing
  Spelling
  Speaking
  Pronunciation

 
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Questions & answers

In this section we (Biritish Council) publish questions and answers sent in by users of the site about English language teaching topics.


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LANGUAGE

Use the links below to discover papers, articles and links on all areas of the beautiful language we teach. Grammar and discourse are separated - some would argue incorrectly - and the links do show that it is a false dichotomy. The lexis pages hopefully give full emphasis to the area of language which is reemerging as central to everything we do in our classes. The phonology pages aim to demonstrate that the teaching of pronunciation is more than the icing on the cake. Finally, the skills pages try to integrate the teaching of reading, writing, listening and speaking in the same way that we approach them in our planning and classroom delivery.
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hilsefl ws

General overviews to detailed discussions. From Chomsky to Halliday. These papers and links hopefully capture the beauty of the wonderful language we teach.

The links and papers here tackle lexis from both the practical and theoretical angles and try to show the importance and central position of words in our language teaching today.

The four skills - or is it five? Each of them looked at through a series of papers and links that show the latest work in how we approach the integration of them in our classrooms.

This page is slowly building up an online version of a twenty hour phonology course. From downloadable phonemic fonts to discussions and worksheets on suprasegmental features, we try to ensure it's all here.

Text and discourse and how we analyse them. What is the difference between grammar and discourse? Is this a useful distinction? These questions and more are discussed in the links and papers here.

 
 
 
One of the best sites for Ts

 

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Motivating Students to Learn New Words in the ESL Classroom



How to Motivate ESL/EFL Students to Read



ESL Lesson Plan: Informal Letter Writing



Thinking About Reading- Previewing Lesson...

 

 


 

 

 

Teaching Listening

 

  Listening skills are vital for your learners. Of the 'four skills,' listening is by far the most frequently used. Listening and speaking are often taught together, but beginners, especially non-literate ones, should be given more listening than speaking practice. It's important to speak as close to natural speed as possible, although with beginners some slowing is usually necessary. Without reducing your speaking speed, you can make your language easier to comprehend by simplifying your vocabulary, using shorter sentences, and increasing the number and length of pauses in your speech.

There are many types of listening activities. Those that don't require learners to produce language in response are easier than those that do. Learners can be asked to physically respond to a command (for example, "please open the door"), select an appropriate picture or object, circle the correct letter or word on a worksheet, draw a route on a map, or fill in a chart as they listen. It's more difficult to repeat back what was heard, translate into the native language, take notes, make an outline, or answer comprehension questions. To add more challenge, learners can continue a story text, solve a problem, perform a similar task with a classmate after listening to a model (for example, order a cake from a bakery), or participate in real-time conversation.

Good listening lessons go beyond the listening task itself with related activities before and after the listening. Here is the basic structure:

  • Before Listening
    Prepare your learners by introducing the topic and finding out what they already know about it. A good way to do this is to have a brainstorming session and some discussion questions related to the topic. Then provide any necessary background information and new vocabulary they will need for the listening activity.
  • During Listening
    Be specific about what students need to listen for. They can listen for selective details or general content, or for an emotional tone such as happy, surprised, or angry. If they are not marking answers or otherwise responding while listening, tell them ahead of time what will be required afterward.
  • After Listening
    Finish with an activity to extend the topic and help students remember new vocabulary. This could be a discussion group, craft project, writing task, game, etc.

The following ideas will help make your listening activities successful.

  • Noise
    Reduce distractions and noise during the listening segment. You may need to close doors or windows or ask children in the room to be quiet for a few minutes.
  • Equipment
    If you are using a cassette player, make sure it produces acceptable sound quality. A counter on the machine will aid tremendously in cueing up tapes. Bring extra batteries or an extension cord with you.
  • Repetition
    Read or play the text a total of 2-3 times. Tell students in advance you will repeat it. This will reduce their anxiety about not catching it all the first time. You can also ask them to listen for different information each time through.
  • Content
    Unless your text is merely a list of items, talk about the content as well as specific language used. The material should be interesting and appropriate for your class level in topic, speed, and vocabulary. You may need to explain reductions (like 'gonna' for 'going to') and fillers (like 'um' or 'uh-huh').
  • Recording Your Own Tape
    Write appropriate text (or use something from your textbook) and have another English speaker read it onto tape. Copy the recording three times so you don't need to rewind. The reader should not simply read three times, because students want to hear exact repetition of the pronunciation, intonation, and pace, not just the words.
  • Video
    You can play a video clip with the sound off and ask students to make predictions about what dialog is taking place. Then play it again with sound and discuss why they were right or wrong in their predictions. You can also play the sound without the video first, and show the video after students have guessed what is going on.
  • Homework
    Give students a listening task to do between classes. Encourage them to listen to public announcements in airports, bus stations, supermarkets, etc. and try to write down what they heard. Tell them the telephone number of a cinema and ask them to write down the playing times of a specific movie. Give them a tape recording of yourself with questions, dictation, or a worksheet to complete.

Look for listening activities in the Activities and Lesson Materials sections of this guide. If your learners can use a computer with internet access and headphones or speakers, you may direct them toward the following listening practice sites. You could also assign specific activities from these sites as homework. Teach new vocabulary ahead of time if necessary.

  • Randall's ESL Cyber Listening Lab
    Around 140 listening clips and quizzes for students to access online; categorized into four difficulty levels, but activities marked 'easy' may be too difficult for beginners due to unfamiliar vocabulary; many include pre- and post-listening exercises; requires audio software such as RealPlayer (free) or optional interactive software like Divace.
  • The English Listening Lounge
    Thirty free listening clips categorized into three difficulty levels for students to access online

 



Daily Listening


These are the 30 newest podcasts for ESL learners.

 
Daily Pronunciation Practice
Listen and Repeat Machine
New things to practice are uploaded every day.

 



Improve Your English Listening Skills

Make sure you have the right software to take advantage of what is available on the www. You can download players and find links to online radio stations at real.com , windowsmedia.com and winamp.com . You can try some of the English radio stations I recommend on my broadcasts page. You can subscribe to podcasts and radio stations on iTunes too.

Films in English are an excellent language resource. Follow my tips on how to use films to improve your English. If you're not sure what films to watch, look at my recommended films pages.

Listening whilst reading is a good idea, there are lots of audio books on the market, I mention some on my recommended books pages, there are also some fun podcasts on the Have Fun with English site and two weekly podcasts on the Interesting Facts site.

Keep up to date with current events and watch an English-language news station, such as BBC World. Watch news reports on events you are already aware of.

Find out how to switch languages on your TV. If you have digital or satellite TV there are several channels that broadcast in multiple languages. Eurosport is one and Euronews is another, you should be able to set these to the English language.

 Use the vocabulary pages to listen to simple vocabulary.

  Use the dictation pages to test your understanding.

  Every Wednesday I run a listening session on iVisit. There are no more excuses.

  Little and often is a good idea, so try my Interesting Facts pages. Every week I write some    interesting facts and there are accompanying sound files for the most interesting facts.

  Use my English magazine Ezine pages to find some interesting articles, poems or stories to listen to.

  Listen to the advert of the month and read the transcript.

  Listen to English songs and read the lyrics.

  A bit of light-hearted fun on the Have Fun with English page. There are new videos or listening files every month.



Articles about "listening comprehension"

 

The Challenge of Teaching Listening Skills
English Listening Quizzes
Listen to a woman speaking about what she likes - and dislikes - about her job. True or False listening comprehension. Level: Upper-intermediate to advanced ...
Number Listening Comprehension Quiz for English ESL EFL Beginning ...
Basic Numbers Listening Quiz for Beginning ESL EFL TESOL TEFL English Learners.
Improve Listening Skills - English listening skils
Listening comprehension is probably the most difficult task (noun=exercise, job) for almost all learners of English as a foreign language. ...
English Listening Exercises - Intermediate Level Listening Quiz ...
Lower-intermediate to Intermediate level listening comprehension quiz concerning a customer complaint.
English Listening Exercises - Lower to Intermediate Level ...
Intermediate level listening comprehension about John's holiday ... Listening comprehension audio kindly provided by the British Schools Group Italy ...
English Teaching - Teaching Listening Skills to ESL Classes
Discussion of the challenge of teaching listening comprehension skills to English as a Second or Foreign Language classes.
English Listening Exercises - Beginner Level Listening Quiz - Prices
Practice your number listening comprehension. Listen to the people speaking about different numbers and write down the number you hear. ...
English Listening Exercises - Beginner Level Listening Quiz ...
Beginner level listening comprehension of a woman answering questions for a survey. ... English Listening Comprehension Quizzes and Tests for ESL EFL ...
English Listening Exercises - Lower to Intermediate ESL English ...
Lower-Intermediate ESL English EFL level listening comprehension about a man's trip to ... English Listening Comprehension Quizzes and Tests for ESL EFL ...
English Listening Exercises - Beginning Level Listening Quiz ...
listening comprehension · listening quiz. English Listening Quizzes: Making a Dinner Reservation. You will hear a man who is making a dinner reservation. ...

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 One of my favourite websites

General Listening Quizzes
[ Listen to Everyday Conversations with Adult and Children's Voices ]
Easy
Answering Machine
A Day at School
Apartments for Rent
Camping Under the Stars
Christmas is Coming!
Clothing Styles
Business Communications
College Life
Daily Schedule
DVD Movie Rentals
Eye Glasses for You
A Fun Day
Family Activities
Family Relationships
First Date
Getting Around Tokyo
Good Old Blues
Hamburger Restaurant
Happy Birthday!
Heavenly Pies Restaurant
Hotel Reservations
Immigration and Customs
Lost in the Crowd
Nice to Meet You
Party Time!
Phone Message
Picnic Preparations
Reading Time
Rental Shop (Version B)
Shopping for the Day
Sightseeing in Town
Snack Time
So, what's the matter?
Spending Money
Tell me about yourself
Train Tickets
Travel Arrangements
Travel on Sky Airlines
What a Busy Day!
Where are you from?
Medium
A Student Credit Card
A Healthy Lifestyle
A Hiking Family
A Story to Remember
Back to School Supplies
Baking Cookies
Breakfast Recipes
Budget Hotel Rooms
Car Rental
College Majors
College Textbooks
Computer Sales
Dinner Time
Driver's License
Emergency Call
Exercise Program
English Language Center
Great Apartment Living
Grocery Shopping
Haven't We Met Before?
Holiday Traditions
Japanese Public Bath
Just a Haircut, Please!
Leisure Activities
Medical Advice
Meeting Singles
New York Travel
Personal Security
Pizza Delivery
Radio Advertising
Saturday's Chores
Show Times
Snacks and Candy
Street Market
Taxi Ride (Medium)
Traffic Ticket
TV Guide
Vacation Plans
Weekly Activities
World of Computers

Difficult
Adsense: Making Money
72-Hour Emergency Kit
A Free Cell Phone!
A University Degree
ABCs of Money Matters
Cancer Treatment
Car Accident
Car Repairs
Dating Woes
Driving Road Test
Enjoying the Zoo
Easy Pet Care
Flower Shop
First Mountain Bank
Friday Night Mishaps
Friendly Dental Care
Funerals: Expressing Condolences
Furniture Store Ad
Home Repairs
Home Security
Hotel Check-In
Housing Complaints
It's a Home Run!
Job Hunting
Movie Review
Personal Problems
Professional Babysitting
Refinancing Mortgage Loans
Rental Shop (Version A)
School Report
Security Systems
Store Returns
Summer Camp
Taxi Ride (Difficult)
Telemarketing
The Ideal Woman
Trivia Game Show
Utah Travel Ad
Video Game Systems
Wedding Anniversary
Where's the movie theater?

Basic Listening Quizzes
[ Short Listening Activites for Beginning and Intermediate Students ]
Easy
Calendars and Dates
Conversation Starters
Directions Around Town (1)
Introductions
Names: Meeting People
Shopping and Prices
Telling Time
Easy
Clothing and Fashion
Directions Around Town (2)
Family Relationships
Hobbies
Restaurants
Shopping Center
Telephone
Medium
Bus Travel
Directions Around Town (3)
ESL Programs
Job Hunting - Quiz 1
Job Hunting - Quiz 2
Movies
Travel and Numbers

Listening Quizzes for Academic Purposes
[ Prepare for TOEFL/TOEIC Tests with These Lectures, Interviews, and Conversations ]
Medium
Arches National Park
Business Meeting
ESL Program Meeting
First Day of Class
Internet Access
Saving the Earth
The Four Seasons
Taped Library Tour
Tour of Kyoto, Japan
Difficult
Airport Announcement
Battle at the Front
Dream Team X
Exotic Animal Kingdom
Friday's Weather Forecast
I Love Trees
Lawsuit Settlement
Space Radio Theater
The Christmas Gift
The Japanese Economy
Very Difficult
A Greener World
A Rare Solar Eclipse
A Visitor from Space
Campaign Speech
Cosmetic Surgery
Learning Languages
Our Aging Society
Raising Successful Children
Traffic Report
Travel Log
World News Stories

 

20-Minute ESL Vocabulary Lessons
[ Click HERE to build your vocabulary and pronunciation of key vocabulary ]
Medium
Airplane Travel
Beauty Salons
Best Dating Ideas!
Car Rental
Renting Apartments
Restaurant Guide
Medium
Computers and the Internet
Education: Online Degrees
Train Travel
Dating and Marriage
Dental Care
Supermarket
Medium
Hotel Reservations
Movies and DVD Rentals
Renting Apartments
Travel

>>>>>>>>> MORE


Language Learning and Life Tips
[ Listen HERE to Language and Life-skills Tips with Audio and Discussion Questions ]
Medium
iPod and MP3 Players
Student Health Insurance
Web Conferencing
Finding Friends on the Internet
Airplane Travel
Medium
Student Credit Cards
Free Email Accounts
Accent Reduction
Online University Degrees
Renting Apartments
Medium
Free Email Accounts
Voice and Text Chat
Online Movie Rentals

>>>>>>>>> MORE


Long Conversations with RealVideo
[ Watch and Learn with these Interviews and Conversations ]
Easy
My Family Roots
Medium
Interview with Steve Ryan
Medium
A Great Car Deal
Bamboo Artifacts
Lecture on Culture Shock
Student Living
Difficult
Guidelines for Investing
News Report
A Rare Solar Eclipse
Gardening Secrets

 

 

Questions & answers

In this section we publish questions and answers sent in by users of the site about English language teaching topics.


 



 

 


 

Teaching Speaking

 

Speaking English is the main goal of many adult learners. Their personalities play a large role in determining how quickly and how correctly they will accomplish this goal. Those who are risk-takers unafraid of making mistakes will generally be more talkative, but with many errors that could become hard-to-break habits. Conservative, shy students may take a long time to speak confidently, but when they do, their English often contains fewer errors and they will be proud of their English ability. It's a matter of quantity vs. quality, and neither approach is wrong. However, if the aim of speaking is communication and that does not require perfect English, then it makes sense to encourage quantity in your classroom. Break the silence and get students communicating with whatever English they can use, correct or not, and selectively address errors that block communication.

Speaking lessons often tie in pronunciation and grammar (discussed elsewhere in this guide), which are necessary for effective oral communication. Or a grammar or reading lesson may incorporate a speaking activity. Either way, your  students will need some preparation before the speaking task. This includes introducing the topic and providing a model of the speech they are to produce. A model may not apply to discussion-type activities, in which case students will need clear and specific instructions about the task to be accomplished. Then the students will practice with the actual speaking activity.

These activities may include imitating (repeating), answering verbal cues, interactive conversation, or an oral presentation. Most speaking activities inherently practice listening skills as well, such as when one student is given a simple drawing and sits behind another student, facing away. The first must give instructions to the second to reproduce the drawing. The second student asks questions to clarify unclear instructions, and neither can look at each other's page during the activity. Information gaps are also commonly used for speaking practice, as are surveys, discussions, and role-plays. Speaking activities abound; see the Activities and Further Resources sections of this guide for ideas.

Here are some ideas to keep in mind as you plan your speaking activities.

  • Content
    As much as possible, the content should be practical and usable in real-life situations. Avoid too much new vocabulary or grammar, and focus on speaking with the language the students have.
  • Correcting Errors
    You need to provide appropriate feedback and correction, but don't interrupt the flow of communication. Take notes while pairs or groups are talking and address problems to the class after the activity without embarrassing the student who made the error. You can write the error on the board and ask who can correct it.
  • Quantity vs. Quality
    Address both interactive fluency and accuracy, striving foremost for communication. Get to know each learner's personality and encourage the quieter ones to take more risks.
  • Conversation Strategies
    Encourage strategies like asking for clarification, paraphrasing, gestures, and initiating ('hey,' 'so,' 'by the way').
  • Teacher Intervention
    If a speaking activity loses steam, you may need to jump into a role-play, ask more discussion questions, clarify your instructions, or stop an activity that is too difficult or boring
    .

 

Speaking English - Pronunciation and Conversation Skills

Improve Your English Speaking and English Pronunciation Skills

  The first rule of speaking English is to speak clearly, concisely and use simple vocabulary. KISS - keep it short and simple.

Remember you probably won't just speak to native speakers. There are roughly 380 million native speakers, but as many as a billion people speak it as a second language. So it's a good idea to avoid idioms and slang (I always say learn it, but don't use it). It might sound clever to say "You're barking up the wrong tree," but if you misuse it or if the other person doesn't understand you, you'll only look silly when you try to explain what you meant to say, or what it actually means.

There's also a saying in English "Have you swallowed a dictionary?" It is applicable to anyone who uses long, complicated words when a shorter word will do. Short sentences are just as good (if not better) than long explanations. The value in what you have to say is what you say, not how clever you look or sound when you say it.

English speaking tips

Get over any fear you might have of making mistakes. You will make mistakes.

Be patient with yourself. Learning any language can be frustrating, but frustration won't help you, so let it go.

Grasp every opportunity you have to speak with people in English.

Talk to friends who are also learning English. Go out together for coffee and only speak English to each other!

Read short stories out loud and try to see, say and hear the words to reinforce your memory. Record yourself and play it back later, how does it sound?

Find native English speaking friends:-

  • You might not be able to find any friendly native speakers where you live, butYou can find English speaking people on the Internet! If you can't find anyone who'll actually help you, don't worry, you'll still be able to figure out if they can understand you.
  • Look for people with the same interests as you. It's no good asking everyone you meet to help you with your English, rather develop natural friendships based on your hobbies etc. Eventually you will make friends and they will be much more likely to give you correction / guidance.
  • Join an English club or conversation group. Around the world there are many English speaking clubs, these clubs aren't just for expats but for people interested in the English way of life. They can be friendly and fun. For a list of English clubs click here. Check magazines as well as your phone book, your local newspaper and your local university. Or if there isn't one in your area - start one! Place an advertisement in your newspaper for people interested in starting a group or go to Meetup.
  • Visit an Irish/English/Australian theme pub or British food shop, you can usually find one in the larger cities. Often, the waiters and waitresses come from English-speaking countries, the menu is often in English too!
  • Once your English is good enough, go shopping in some tourist areas. You'll find lots of shop assistants speak very good English.
  • If you can travel to an English speaking country, do it.
  • There are several internet based voice chat programmes out there: iVisit | Pal Talk | MSN Web Messenger | Yahoo! Messenger | Google Talk | Skype and lots more.

 

 

English pronunciation and speaking help including exercises, IPA help, lesson plans, conversation tips and strategies for ESL EFL classes and teachers.

Speaking - Beginner (15)      Conversation Lesson Plans (40)      Speaking - Intermediate (46)      Pronunciation Lesson Plans (13)      Pronunciation Techniques (19)      Conversation Sites (8)  Speaking - Advanced (11)      Pronunciation Software (9)

 

 

 

 Teaching Pronunciation

 

Pronunciation involves far more than individual sounds. Word stress, sentence stress, intonation, and word linking all influence the sound of spoken English, not to mention the way we often slur words and phrases together in casual speech. 'What are you going to do?' becomes 'Whaddaya gonna do?' English pronunciation involves too many complexities for learners to strive for a complete elimination of accent, but improving pronunciation will boost self esteem, facilitate communication, and possibly lead to a better job or a least more respect in the workplace. Effective communication is of greatest importance, so choose first to work on problems that significantly hinder communication and let the rest go. Remember that your students also need to learn strategies for dealing with misunderstandings, since native pronunciation is for most an unrealistic goal.

A student's first language often interferes with English pronunciation. For example, /p/ is aspirated in English but not in Spanish, so when a Spanish speaker pronounces 'pig' without a puff of air on the /p/, an American may hear 'big' instead. Sometimes the students will be able to identify specific problem sounds and sometimes they won't. You can ask them for suggestions, but you will also need to observe them over time and make note of problem sounds. Another challenge resulting from differences in the first language is the inability to hear certain English sounds that the native language does not contain. Often these are vowels, as in 'ship' and 'sheep,' which many learners cannot distinguish. The Japanese are known for confusing /r/ and /l/, as their language contains neither of these but instead has one sound somewhere between the two. For problems such as these, listening is crucial because students can't produce a sound they can't hear. Descriptions of the sound and mouth position can help students increase their awareness of subtle sound differences.

Here are some ideas for focusing on specific pronunciation features.

  • Voicing
    Voiced sounds will make the throat vibrate. For example, /g/ is a voiced sound while /k/ is not, even though the mouth is in the same position for both sounds. Have your students touch their throats while pronouncing voiced and voiceless sounds. They should feel vibration with the voiced sounds only.
  • Aspiration
    Aspiration refers to a puff of air when a sound is produced. Many languages have far fewer aspirated sounds than English, and students may have trouble hearing the aspiration. The English /p/, /t/, /k/, and /ch/ are some of the more commonly aspirated sounds. Although these are not always aspirated, at the beginning of a word they usually are. To illustrate aspiration, have your students hold up a piece of facial tissue a few inches away from their mouths and push it with a puff of air while pronouncing a word containing the target sound.
  • Mouth Position
    Draw simple diagrams of tongue and lip positions. Make sure all students can clearly see your mouth while you model sounds. Have students use a mirror to see their mouth, lips, and tongue while they imitate you.
  • Intonation
    Word or sentence intonation can be mimicked with a kazoo, or alternatively by humming. This will take the students' attention off of the meaning of a word or sentence and help them focus on the intonation.
  • Linking
    We pronounce phrases and even whole sentences as one smooth sound instead of a series of separate words. 'Will Amy go away,' is rendered 'Willaymeegowaway.' To help learners link words, try starting at the end of a sentence and have them repeat a phrase, adding more of the sentence as they can master it. For example, 'gowaway,' then 'aymeegowaway,' and finally 'Willaymeegowaway' without any pauses between words.
  • Vowel Length
    You can demonstrate varying vowel lengths within a word by stretching rubber bands on the longer vowels and letting them contract on shorter ones. Then let the students try it. For example, the word 'fifteen' would have the rubber band stretched for the 'ee' vowel, but the word 'fifty' would not have the band stretched because both of its vowels are spoken quickly.
  • Syllables
    • Have students count syllables in a word and hold up the correct number of fingers, or place objects on table to represent each syllable.
    • Illustrate syllable stress by clapping softly and loudly corresponding to the syllables of a word. For example, the word 'beautiful' would be loud-soft-soft. Practice with short lists of words with the same syllabic stress pattern ('beautiful,' 'telephone,' 'Florida') and then see if your learners can list other words with that pattern.
  • Specific Sounds
    • Minimal pairs, or words such as 'bit/bat' that differ by only one sound, are useful for helping students distinguish similar sounds. They can be used to illustrate voicing ('curl/girl') or commonly confused sounds ('play/pray'). Remember that it's the sound and not the spelling you are focusing on.
    • Tongue twisters are useful for practicing specific target sounds, plus they're fun. Make sure the vocabulary isn't too difficult.
    • The Sounds of English, American Accent Training, and EnglishClub.com websites below offer guidelines for describing how to produce various English sounds. You can find representative practice words for every English sound on the English is Soup site.

Here are some resources for teaching pronunciation.

 

 

Authentic American Pronunciation

 

Consonant Sounds
Vowel Sounds
Teaching Pronunciation




 

How To Improve Your English


Here's How:

·  Remember that learning a language is a gradual process - it does not happen overnight.

·  Define your learning objectives early: What do you want to learn and why?

·  Make learning a habit. Try to learn something every day. It is much better to study (or read, or listen to English news, etc.) 10 minutes each day than to study for 2 hours once a week.

·  Remember to make learning a habit! If you study each day for 10 minutes English will be constantly in your head. If you study once a week, English will not be as present in your mind.

·  Choose your materials well. You will need reading, grammar, writing, speaking and listening materials

·  Vary your learning routine. It is best to do different things each day to help keep the various relationships between each area active. In other words, don't just study grammar.

·  Find friends to study and speak with. Learning English together can be very encouraging.

·  Choose listening and reading materials that relate to what you are interested in. Being interested in the subject will make learning more enjoyable - thus more effective.

·  Relate grammar to practical usage. Grammar by itself does not help you USE the language. You should practice what you are learning by employing it actively.

·  Move your mouth! Understanding something doesn't mean the muscles of your mouth can produce the sounds. Practice speaking what you are learning aloud. It may seem strange, but it is very effective.

·  Be patient with yourself. Remember learning is a process - speaking a language well takes time. It is not a computer that is either on or off!

·  Communicate! There is nothing like communicating in English and being successful. Grammar exercises are good - having your friend on the other side of the world understand your email is fantastic!

·  Use the Internet. The Internet is the most exciting, unlimited English resource that anyone could imagine and it is right at your finger tips.

 

 

 


 

How to Improve your Vocabulary

 

However, it won't be much help on a vocabulary test next week. Hereare a number of methods to help you improve, and expand, your English vocabulary. ...

Improve Your Pronunciation

How to improve your English pronunciation. Whether you prefer US or British pronunciation, follow this guide to help you improve English pronunciation ...

 

 

Improve Your English Vocabulary

Use self-study vocabulary books, these should include a good dictionary, and a thesaurus.

Expose yourself to as much English as possible by reading, watching the TV, films or the news and listening to the radio or music.

Read an English magazine. If you can afford it take out a subscription to a magazine or newspaper.

Do online exercises. Keep a note of how you did and go back in a few weeks to see how you have improved.

Use stick it notes and label things around your home.

Try to memorize whole sentences, not just individual words.

Create or play word games. Scrabble, Crossword Puzzles, Hangman, and Dingbats are all great was to play with words.

Keep a notebook to help you remember what you've learnt.

Here's a guide to keeping an English notebook.

Vocabulary webs

Build a vocabulary web to organise your vocabulary about certain subjects.

For example your personal life:-

and then extend it:-

and then extend it further...

Try this little gadget too.

Flash cards

Start a flash cards box.

Buy or cut out some cards all the same size.

Draw or cut out some pictures.

Paste the pictures onto one side of the card and write the correct word on the other side.

Put new words in the front of the box.

Test yourself using either the pictures, the words or both.

If you have forgotten a word bring it to the front of the box.

- Use the vocabulary pages to learn new vocabulary thematically and in context.

- You can use my on-line flash cards to practise your vocabulary.

Singing

Try learning the words to English songs, and even sing along with them. With friends or in the privacy of your own bathroom.

- You can find some karaoke resources and ideas on the learn English through songs page.

 You can find the words to some popular songs on the English magazine.

 

 

English Vocabulary

 

 

The Basics

The Alphabet | Animals | Appearances | Colours | Computers
Days and Dates | Families | Greetings
Nationalities and countries | Numbers | Seasons | Shapes | Time
The weather | The UK | (Business English Basics)

Other Themes

Buildings | Clothes | Eating | Education
Entertainment | Food
Human Body | Jobs and Work | Life and Death | Money
Rooms in a house | Shopping | Sport | Transport

 

 

Common Mistakes and Confusing Words in English

Let's face it, English can be confusing. A lot of words are similar but with different meanings. It is almost impossible to avoid making mistakes in English, but you might be able to avoid making these ones.

accept vs except | advice vs advise
affect vs effect | a lot/alot/allot
all ready vs already | all right vs alright | alone vs lonely
altogether vs all together | ambivalent vs indifferent
any vs some | any one vs anyone
apart vs a part | at vs in
been vs gone | beside vs besides
bored vs boring | borrow vs lend
bought vs brought | by vs until
check vs control | come over vs overcome
complement vs compliment
concentrate vs concentrated | council vs counsel
councillor vs counsellor | curious vs interesting
data vs datum | decent vs descent
defrost vs melt
do or make | discreet vs discrete
don't have to vs mustn't
| downside vs underside
driving test vs test drive
effect vs affect | e.g. or i.e. | either or vs neither nor
either vs as well / too
enquire vs inquire | enquiry vs inquiry
every day vs everyday | excited vs exciting
expand vs expend | experience vs experience(s)
fewer vs less
| for vs since (time) | good vs well | gone vs been
hard vs hardly | hear vs listen | heroin vs heroine | he's vs his
holiday vs the weekend | homework vs housework
"How do you do?" vs "How are you?"
I vs me | improve vs improvise
inquire vs enquire | inquiry vs enquiry
interested vs interesting
lay vs lie
| lay down vs lie down | less vs fewer
look after vs look for | look at vs watch
look forward(s) | look forward to
look over vs overlook | loose vs lose
me vs I | me vs my | moan vs mourn
most vs the most
| most vs mostly
nor vs or
overtake vs takeover / take over
personal vs personnel | practice vs practise
precede vs proceed | principal vs principle
quiet vs quite
raise/rise | regard vs regardless vs regards
remember vs remind | replay vs reply
said vs told | see vs watch | shortage vs shortness
so vs such | some vs any | stationary vs stationery
take care vs take care of | that/which/who | to/too/two| there/their/they're
trainer vs trainee | travel/trip/voyage/journey
used to vs used to do
wander vs wonder | what vs which | who vs whom
wrong vs wrongly

Tests and Quizzes

 

 TEACHING AND LEARNING VOCABULARY

 

And this book 

 

Other chapters of this book

♥ 

Vocabulary Learning in a Second Language: Person, Task, Context and Strategies

 

Findings of the National Reading Panel

  • Intentional instruction of vocabulary items is required for specific texts.
  • Repetition and multiple exposures to vocabulary items are important.
  • Learning in rich contexts is valuable for vocabulary learning. Vocabulary tasks should be restructured as necessary.
  • Vocabulary learning should entail active engagement in learning tasks.
  • Computer technology can be used effectively to help teach vocabulary.
  • Vocabulary can be acquired through incidental learning. How vocabulary is assessed and evaluated can have differential effects on instruction.
  • Dependence on a single vocabulary instructional method will not result in optimal learning.

 

Quizzes
Antonyms
Homonyms
Homophones
Idioms
Phrasal Verbs
SAT
Slang
Synonyms
TOEFL
Word Frequency Lists

 


 

 

Glitter Graphics

Improve Your Reading Skills

Make a habit of reading regularly. Read as many English books, newspapers and magazines as you can get your hands on.

Reading should be fun, so make sure the texts you choose are not too too difficult for you. If the book or article you are reading is a chore, then find something easier. Try reading graded books written especially for ESL learners. I've written a guide on how to choose a book here.

Find an author you like and read all their books. By doing this you will get used to the style of a particular author and the typical vocabulary and grammar they use. As you read more of his/her books you will find it easier and easier.

If you have a local library find out if they stock English books or if they have bilingual editions of English classics. Or ask them to stock English translations of books you are already familiar with.

Try reading things more than once. Read something and then read it again a few weeks/months later. You should find your understanding has improved.

Try to discuss a book you've enjoyed with other people. You can even discuss books with me on the forum, or there are lots of online book clubs and you can even write reviews on book selling sites.

Don't try to read "the classics". Save them for later, start with contemporary short stories. And don't forget, there are loads of excellent comics out there too. I actually started learning German by reading Winnie the Pooh!

!Learning Tip - don't try to understand every word. Try to understand the overall meaning of a sentence or passage.

!Learning Tip - don't translate - only use a dictionary if a word keeps appearing in a text and you still don't understand it.

!Learning Tip - don't just read a book and then forget about it - try to analyse it. You can use this reading log to help you.

!On this site:- Use the English Magazine to find some interesting articles, poems and jokes to read. If there's a word you don't understand double click it with your mouse and the definition will pop up. There are no more excuses.

!On this site:- Check out my recommended books.

!On this site:- Try some Speed Reading tips to increase your reading speed.

 

 

Online practice reading tests

 

Grade
1

Grade
2

Grade
3

Grade
4

Grade
5

Grade
6

Grade
7

Grade
8

 

 

 ***********************************************

 

Reading Comprehension Activities

Reading Lesson Plans

English Learning Techiques

Related Articles

 

*********************************************************

 

Articles about "reading comprehension"

 

Reading Comprehension - My Friend Peter - Beginning Level Reading ...

Short Reading Comprehension Quiz for beginners with follow-up multiple choice and true and false quiz.

Take a Reading Comprehension Multiple Choice Test

how to take a multiple choice reading comprehension test for advanced level ESL EFL learners.

Reading Lesson - Text Scanning - Reading Skils - Scanning ...

Reading Comprehension Skills - Scanning. Scanning is used to discover required information to complete a given task such as making a decision about what to ...

John F. Kennedy: Reading Comprehension - English as 2nd Language ...

Reading Comprehension based on John F. Kennedy's 1961 Inagural Speech , 10/19/97 from your About.com Guide.

Reading Comprehension Lesson Plans

Incorporating reading comprehension and dialogues into a lesson plan to help focus on specific grammar or subject areas. The following lesson plan is a ...

Social Networking Sites - Reading Comprehension

Reading comprehension for ESL learners focusing on the growth of social networking sites. Key vocabulary list provided, as well as follow-up comprehension ...

Reading Comprehension - A Secretary's Desk - Office Use ...

Short Reading Comprehension Quiz for beginners concerning a typical secretary's desk.

Summer Olympic Games - Olympics and Reading Comprehension

Reading comprehension for ESL learners focusing on the Summer Olympic Games. Key vocabulary list provided, as well as follow-up comprehension quiz.

ESL Fairy Tale Reading Comprehension - The Old Man and the ...

This reading comprehension includes difficult vocabulary (in bold) defined at the end, as well as a reading comprehension quiz to check your understanding. ...

 

1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10

 

 

Practice Intermediate Reading

 

Comprehension Texts

 

 

 

 Reading Theory as a Microcosm of the Four Skills

 

 

Helping ESL Students Become Better Readers:

Schema Theory Applications and Limitations

 

 ∏♥∏

 

 

 


Check Your Reading Speed
Teach Reading John Nemes
Teach Reading Beth Lewis
Teach Reading AFT
Extensive Reading iteslj.org
Learning to Read ERIC
Learning to Read antimoon
How to Read a Short Story Becky Patterson
100 Things To Do With Books New Zealand Ministry of Education

Activities & Comprehension Exercises
Reading for ESL Students english-online.at
Activities Extensive Reading / Tom Robb
Activities ABC Teach
Activities M. Kalinowska
AP Lit duncanville.k12.tx.us

Study Guides
Book Reviews Complete Review
Study Guides CyberGuides
Study Guides Spark Notes

Study Guides Paul Brians

 

 


 

 Teaching Writing

 

Glitter Graphics

 

 

  Good writing conveys a meaningful message and uses English well, but the message is more important than correct presentation. If you can understand the message or even part of it, your student has succeeded in communicating on paper and should be praised for that. For many adult ESL learners, writing skills will not be used much outside your class. This doesn't mean that they shouldn't be challenged to write, but you should consider their needs and balance your class time appropriately. Many adults who do not need to write will enjoy it for the purpose of sharing their thoughts and personal stories, and they appreciate a format where they can revise their work into better English than if they shared the same information orally.

Two writing strategies you may want to use in your lessons are free writing and revised writing. Free writing directs students to simply get their ideas onto paper without worrying much about grammar, spelling, or other English mechanics. In fact, the teacher can choose not to even look at free writing pieces. To practice free writing, give students 5 minutes in class to write about a certain topic, or ask them to write weekly in a journal. You can try a dialog journal where students write a journal entry and then give the journal to a partner or the teacher, who writes another entry in response. The journals may be exchanged during class, but journal writing usually is done at home. The main characteristic of free writing is that few (if any) errors are corrected by the teacher, which relieves students of the pressure to perform and allows them to express themselves more freely.

Revised writing, also called extended or process writing, is a more formal activity in which students must write a first draft, then revise and edit it to a final polished version, and often the finished product is shared publicly. You may need several class sessions to accomplish this. Begin with a pre-writing task such as free writing, brainstorming, listing, discussion of a topic, making a timeline, or making an outline. Pairs or small groups often work well for pre-writing tasks. Then give the students clear instructions and ample time to write the assignment. In a class, you can circulate from person to person asking, "Do you have any questions?" Many students will ask a question when approached but otherwise would not have raised a hand to call your attention. Make yourself available during the writing activity; don't sit at a desk working on your next lesson plan. Once a rough draft is completed, the students can hand in their papers for written comment, discuss them with you face to face, or share them with a partner, all for the purpose of receiving constructive feedback. Make sure ideas and content are addressed first; correcting the English should be secondary. Finally, ask students to rewrite the piece. They should use the feedback they received to revise and edit it into a piece they feel good about. Such finished pieces are often shared with the class or posted publicly, and depending on the assignment, you may even choose to 'publish' everyone's writing into a class booklet.

Tactful correction of student writing is essential. Written correction is potentially damaging to confidence because it's very visible and permanent on the page. Always make positive comments and respond to the content, not just the language. Focus on helping the student clarify the meaning of the writing. Especially at lower levels, choose selectively what to correct and what to ignore. Spelling should be a low priority as long as words are recognizable. To reduce ink on the page, don't correct all errors or rewrite sentences for the student. Make a mark where the error is and let the student figure out what's wrong and how to fix it. At higher levels you can tell students ahead of time exactly what kinds of errors (verbs, punctuation, spelling, word choice) you will correct and ignore other errors. If possible, in addition to any written feedback you provide, try to respond orally to your student's writing, making comments on the introduction, overall clarity, organization, and any unnecessary information.

Consider the following ideas for your writing lessons.

  • Types of Tasks
    Here are some ideas for the types of writing you can ask your students to do.
    • Copying text word for word
    • Writing what you dictate
    • Imitating a model
    • Filling in blanks in sentences or paragraphs
    • Taking a paragraph and transforming certain language, for example changing all verbs and time references to past tense
    • Summarizing a story text, video, or listening clip (you can guide with questions or keywords)
    • Making lists of items, ideas, reasons, etc. (words or sentences depending on level)
    • Writing what your students want to learn in English and why
    • Writing letters (complaint, friend, advice) - give blank post cards or note cards or stationery to add interest; you can also use this to teach how to address an envelope
    • Organizing information, for example making a grid of survey results or writing directions to a location using a map
    • Reacting to a text, object, picture, etc. - can be a word or whole written piece
  • Format
    Clarify the format. For an essay, you may specify that you want an introduction, main ideas, support, and a conclusion. For a poem, story, list, etc., the format will vary accordingly, but make sure your students know what you expect.
  • Model
    Provide a model of the type of writing you want your students to do, especially for beginners.
  • Editing
    Consider giving students a checklist of points to look for when editing their own work. Include such things as clear topic sentences, introduction and conclusion, verb tenses, spelling, capitalization, etc.
  • Correction
    Minimize the threatening appearance of correction. Instead of a red pen, use green or blue or even pencil, as long as it's different from what the student used. Explain to the students that you will use certain symbols such as VT for verb tense or WO for word order, and be very clear whether a mark (check mark, X, star, circle) means correct or incorrect as this varies among cultures.

 

 

 

English Writing Skills

 

Beginning Writing (10)   Writing Style (30)    Intermediate Writing (22)    Writing for Work (19)                  Advanced Writing (35)    Writing Lesson Plans (23)

 

 

 

English Grammar

 

 

Teaching Grammar

Grammar is often named as a subject difficult to teach. Its technical language and complex rules can be intimidating. Teaching a good grammar lesson is one thing, but what if you're in the middle of a reading or speaking activity and a student has a grammar question? Some students may have studied grammar in their home countries and be surprised that you don't understand, "Does passive voice always need the past participle?" But even if your student's question is simple and jargon-free, explaining grammar is a skill you will need to acquire through practice. If you don't know how to explain it on the spot, write down the specific sentence or structure in question and tell the student you will find out. There are several resources below that can help you understand and explain various grammar issues.

Consider the following as you integrate grammar into your lessons.

  • Acknowledge your role.
    As a volunteer, you aren't expected to be a grammar expert. You may have difficulty explaining the 'why' behind grammar points, but you can recognize 'right' and 'wrong' wording and your students will still benefit from your English sensibility.
  • Find good lesson plans.
    It's difficult to make a good grammar lesson from scratch, so any searching you do for appropriate grammar lessons in textbooks or on the Internet will be time well spent. See the Lesson Materials section of this guide for possible resources.
  • Use meaningful texts.
    The sentences you use to teach and practice grammar shouldn't be random. Choose material that is relevant. For example, if your learners are preparing for citizenship or need workplace English, use these contexts to create appropriate examples. If possible, bring in real-life, authentic texts to illustrate your points.
  • Teach basic grammar words.
    Although you need not be fluent in grammar jargon, it's a good idea to teach at least some vocabulary (noun, verb, past tense, etc.) to assist you in your explanations. Intermediate and advanced students may be familiar with many such words already. As a practice activity, you can choose 2-3 parts of speech, specify different symbols for each (underline, circle, box), and have students mark their occurrences in a sentence or paragraph.

The links below will help you understand and explain various grammar points. The first two are from British sources, so don't be distracted by non-American spelling.

 

 

The Tenses

Overview | Simple Present | Simple Future | Simple Past
Present Continuous | Future Continuous | Past Continuous
Present Perfect Simple | Present Perfect Future | Present Perfect Continuous
Past Perfect Simple | Past Perfect Continuous
The Future

 


 

 

Things can happen now, in the future or in the past. The tenses show the time of a verb's action or being. The verb ending is changed (conjugated) to show roughly what time it is referring to.

Time can be split into three periods The Present (what you are doing), The Past (what you did) and The Future (what you are going to do).

The tenses we use to show what time we are talking about are split into the Simple, Continuous and Perfect tenses.

In English we use two tenses to talk about the present and six tenses to talk about the past. There are several ways to talk about the future some of which use the present tenses, these are:

PresentSimple Present

Present Continuous
PastSimple Past

Past Continuous

Present Perfect Simple

Present Perfect Continuous

Past Perfect Simple

Past Perfect Continuous
FutureUsing the Simple Present

Using the Present Continuous

Using the Present Perfect Simple

Using the Present Perfect Continuous

Using going to

Using shall/will

 


 

 

English Tests Page

 

Here you will find English tests online to test your listening, memory, vocabulary, reading and comprehension, spelling and grammar skills.

Some of the tests will open up in a new browser window, when you have finished the game just close the window.

 
| Confusing words | Dictation | Grammar | Memory


Placement | Reading and Comprehension | Sorting |

Vocabulary

 

 

English Word Games

Battleships | Crosswords | Ding Things
Fiendish Games | Forum Games
Hangman | Homophones | Memory | Odd One Out | Scramble
Vocabulary Game | Wordsearch Games | Wordsquare Game
Quizzes Page | English Tests Page

 

 

 QUIZZEZ

 

Grammar-EGrammar-MGrammar-D

 Vocabulary-E

Vocabulary-MVocabulary-D

 

PARTS of SPEECH
Adjectives
... Articles
Conjunctions ... Prepositions
Nouns ... Pronouns

Test Your English About.com
Test Your English Alpha Sprachinstitut / Austria
Test Your English Amerika-Institut
Test Your English BKC-International House / Russia
Test Your English Boston Language Institute
Test Your English Canadian Business English Institute
Test Your English Sven Cederberg
Test Your English Churchill House School of English
Test Your English Colchester
Test Your English Direct English
Test Your English Dublin School of English
Test Your English EmbassyCES
Test Your English English for Everybody
Test Your English English Jet
Test Your English English Learner
Test Your English english-online.org.uk
Test Your English ESL Blue(s)
Test Your English Fiesta
Test Your English Goethe Verlag
Test Your English Inlingua
Test Your English The International School
Test Your English kursusinggris.wordpress
Test Your English lapasserelle.com
Test Your English learnenglish
Test Your English Lingua@net Europa
Test Your English Linguaphonegroup
Test Your English Miguel Millop
Test Your English Net Learn Languages
Test Your English Parlo
Test Your English PEAK English
Test Your English Jiri Srba
Test Your English Spotlight / Germany
Test Your English Sprachaufenthalte
Test Your English Stratford School
Test Your English Test My English
Test Your English Test Den / Japan
Test Your English VanWest College
Test Your English VEC / Canada
Test Your English Wordskills
Test Your English World English

Lesson Planning


Lesson planning and preparation can take an hour or more for every hour of teaching, but the time required will be reduced as you gain experience, plan lessons that carry over week to week, and find good teaching materials such as textbooks or online lessons.






ENGLISH  LANGUAGE  ACTIVITIES, EXERCISES AND TESTS

 

 Helpful links

      
 

Online Assessment Tests

TEST YOUR ENGLISH LEVEL

ENGLISH ASSESSMENT TEST new english language resource

MORE ASSESSMENT TESTS

CAMBRIDGE PLACEMENT TEST

 

Vocabulary Reference    

TOP 500 ENGLISH WORDS

TOP 100 ENGLISH VERBS

TOP 100 MISSPELT WORDS

100 WORDS FOR ADVANCED LEARNERS

WORLD ENGLISH SLANG

LEARN AN IDIOM A DAY

PHRASE THESAURUS and WORDNET

ENGLISH FIRST NAMES AND MEANINGS

DIFFICULT ENGLISH WORDS

 

Vocabulary Activities and Tests

VOCABULARY COMPETITION

VOCABULARY TESTS A - C

VOCABULARY TESTS D - F 

VOCABULARY TESTS G - I

VOCABULARY TESTS J - L

VOCABULARY TESTS M - O

VOCABULARY TESTS P - R

VOCABULARY TESTS S - U

VOCABULARY TESTS V - Z

VOCABULARY (Intermediate)

VOCABULARY (Advanced)

VOCABULARY (Adj / Prep)

BANKING AND FINANCE TEST  

MEDICAL VOCABULARY

REPRODUCTION  

COCKNEY RHYMING SLANG 

UNITED KINGDOM

SHOPPING VOCABULARY

CONFUSING WORDS

WORD JUMBLER 

PHRASAL VERBS

MISSING WORDS

MISSING WORDS # 2

WORD FORMATION QUIZ

FINANCIAL VOCABULARY

HOMONYMS

HOMONYMS # 2 

SCRAMBLED WORDS (easy!)

SYNONYM and ANTONYM

MORE OPPOSITES

ANAGRAMS

COUNTRY ADJECTIVES

CAR PARTS VOCABULARY

FOOTBALL VOCABULARY

FIND THE ODD-WORD-OUT

WORD GROUPS

GAP-FILL EXERCISES

'CAR REVIEWS' GAP-FILL

'POLAND' GAP-FILL EXERCISE

'BRITISH RECIPES' GAP-FILL

CRACK THE CODE

TELEVISION AND THE MEDIA

ELEMENTARY VOCABULARY PRACTICE

 

General Language Practice

INCOMPLETE SENTENCES  

COMMON PHRASES AND EXPRESSIONS

TESTS FOR ALL LEVELS  

IQ STYLE TESTS

 

Literature based Language Quizzes

ROBINSON CRUSOE  

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

GILGAMESH new tests added on a regular basis

 

 


Online Distance Learning

FREE ENGLISH LESSONS BY EMAIL

FREE ONLINE SPEAKING LESSONS

 

Grammar Exercises and Tests

DIAGNOSTIC GRAMMAR TEST

ENGLISH ARTICLES (a, an, the)

PREPOSITIONS AND ARTICLES

PREPOSITIONS (on, it, by etc.) 

MORE PREPOSITIONS!

PREPOSITIONAL PHRASES

PREPOSITION + NOUN

PREPOSITION + ADJECTIVE

PREPOSITION + GERUND

FUTURE FORMS IN ENGLISH

COMPARATIVES/SUPERLATIVES

CONDITIONALS

QUANTIFIERS

ADJECTIVE PLACEMENT

MODAL VERBS

CONJUNCTIONS

QUESTION TAGS

GERUND OR INFINITIVE?

REPORTED SPEECH

PRONOUNS

REWRITING SENTENCES (FCE)

NOUNS FROM VERBS

MAKE or DO

FOR or SINCE

BORROW or LEND

SO or SUCH

SAY or TELL

WORD ORDER

SIMPLE PRESENT OR PRESENT CONTINUOUS

CORRECTING SENTENCES

CORRECT THE MISTAKE

PASSIVE TEST

THE PASSIVE VOICE

MIXED GRAMMAR GAP-FILL QUIZ

EXTENDED GRAMMAR PRACTICE

ENGLISH TENSES AND MORE

IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH FAST

 

On-line Grammar Reference

ENGLISH TENSES TIMELINE

THE FIVE MOST COMMON TENSES

IRREGULAR VERB CHART

GRAMMAR RULES EXPLAINED

ADVANCED GRAMMAR EXPLAINED

 

Writing

TEST YOUR WRITING SKILLS

HELP WITH WRITING

LEARN ENGLISH PUNCTUATION

WRITING COMPETITION

PROOFREADING EXERCISES

 

Sound and Vision

VIDEONATION - LIFE IN BRITAIN

AUSTRALIAN SHORT FILMS

THE WEAKEST LINK QUIZ general knowledge quiz

 

Speaking

ONLINE ENGLISH LESSONS  

ONLINE PHONETICS

ENGLISH TONGUE TWISTERS

 

Student and Teacher Discussion

ENGLISH LANGUAGE CHAT AND FORUMS

THE LANGUAGE DOCTOR

 


Reading

ENGLISH WEBQUESTS

READING  COMPREHENSION

MINI READING TEST

IMPROVE YOUR READING SKILLS

GLOBAL NEWSPAPERS

INTERESTING NEWS STORIES

FIFTY AMAZING FACTS

FUN FACTS QUIZ new english language exercise

ENGLISH PROVERBS

CLASSIC SHORT STORIES  

CLASSIC ENGLISH POETRY

TYPING TEST GAME

 

Listening Resources

BBC RADIO via the Internet

ENGLISH AROUND THE WORLD

LISTENING COMPREHENSION

NEWS STORIES FROM ENGLAND

STORIES FOR CHILDREN

Puzzles and Quizzes

ONLINE HANGMAN

WORDSEARCH PUZZLES

ENGLISH LANGUAGE GAMES

HOLIDAYS AND FESTIVALS

SPELLING TEST

THE PUZZLE PAGE

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE 1

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE 2

ENGLISH LITERATURE

FAMOUS LINES FROM LITERATURE

USA QUIZ

BRITISH QUIZ

MURPHY'S LAW

ENGLISH LANGUAGE QUIZ

VERBAL REASONING QUIZ

ENGLISH RIDDLES

TEST YOUR SLANG

PROVERBS TEST

WORD RIDDLES

 

Other English Resources

 

HOW TO LEARN ENGLISH

ELECTRONIC DICTIONARIES

RECOMMENDED ESL / EFL BOOKS

FREE CAMBRIDGE FCE SOFTWARE

WEB-BASED ESL / EFL ACTIVITIES

ENGLISH ACCENT AND DIALECT

MILITARY ENGLISH

BUSINESS ENGLISH

SMS SHORTHAND ENGLISH

TOEFL ENGLISH TEST

IAELTS ENGLISH TEST

SAT / ELPT TEST

CAMBRIDGE EXAMS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE VOTE

ESL / EFL OPINION POLLS  

GLOBAL ENGLISH MISTAKES

ONLINE CAMBRIDGE DICTIONARY 

BEGINNERS GUIDE TO ENGLISH

LANGUAGE WEBRING

 

The Culture and History of English-Speaking Countries

'ANGLIK' - ENGLISH ON THE INTERNET

Friends Around The World

PENPALS / PENFRIENDS / EPALS / KEYPALS / SMS PALS / FRIENDS

 

Misc. English Study and Other things

Travel Survival screen shot

Learn useful setences for travel.

Crazy Sentence Singer screen  shot

Make sentences by clicking buttons and listen to them being sung.

Computer Assisted Writing screen shot

Enter some words and the computer does the rest.

Slider Puzzle screen shot

Put the sentence into its correct word order by clicking words to move them.

Joggle screen  shot

This game may be difficult for ESL and EFL students. It is popular with native English speakers.

Daily Page for Students of English screen  shot

New Every Day

Some of Our Quizzes at a4esl.org


Proofreading / Editing

Punctuation

Misc. / Various / Assorted